Check out this next auction for a 1995 Regal Cabin Cruiser boat. It measures 25'6" in length, has a powerful 235HP twin Mercruiser engine, and a fiberglass hull. Inside the boat you'll find a full spacious cabin, sink, refrigerator, microwave, and bathroom. VIN: RGMHC192J495. The current price for this seized boat is at $4,550, with 4 days and 5 hours left to bid. Click here now for full membership access. It's simple and easy so don't miss out!
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd, beginning at 11:07 am.  Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: There is no inspection for   [ View Full Listing ]
Browse different government departments' websites. The federal government offers different auction sites based on department. The U.S. Department of Justice offers property seized from criminals. The U.S. Department of the Treasury offers property seized from people who didn’t pay taxes to the Internal Revenue Service. The Department of Defense sells surplus and scrap assets such as aircraft parts, electronic test equipment, medical equipment, uniforms and vehicles.

When it comes to car auctions, try not to put all your eggs in one basket, because there will always be more chances to score a sweet ride on the cheap. Like gambling, it’s always good to have a limit in place before the bidding starts, because nothing sucks more than overspending on a car that only gets you halfway home before the damn transmission craps out.
It is important to have realistic expectations when attending a government car auction. While you can find some good bargains, you are not going to find a brand new BMW for $100.00. Government auctions sell both fleet cars and vehicles that have been impounded by government agencies. The conditions of these vehicles can range from great to not running. Set your expectations and budget realistically.
We are a premier full-service private auction company liquidating property seized by police and federal agencies, property from abandoned safe deposit boxes, seized bank assets, bankruptcies, financial institutions, business inventory liquidations, and other consignors. Our firm conducts traditional live auctions throughout the year at various locations across the country, as well as auctions on the Internet. Please see our schedule of upcoming auctions for further details.
Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house
The public may view the vehicles from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. the day of the auction. In order to bid on a vehicle, you must be registered with the Impound Lot before 9 a.m. on the day of auction. Registrations will not be processed after 9 a.m. There is a $5 fee to obtain a bidder number for the auction. You must be 18 or older to bid. Additional attendees with a bidder are $1 each, including children. One person in each party must register as a bidder. Everyone in your party must be present when the bidder registers in order to be allowed in for the attendee fee of $1. The bidder's name will be the name the Bill of Sale is printed in. This cannot be changed.
The majority of the vehicles found at local auctions will need some work done to them in order to be deemed “road-worthy.” Knowing this before you ever set foot on the grounds is a major part of deciding if this is the right way for you to source an automobile. A low bid on a crappy car has the potential to leave you stranded on the side of the road, so if you aren’t a savvy DIY wrencher, you’d better have one hell of a trustworthy mechanic.
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