Unlike most Public Auto Auctions that only let you inspect the vehicle the day of the sale, we offer a full preview on all of our vehicles Wednesdays from 10am to 4pm and Thursdays from 10am to 5pm. You can start them up, look under the hood, check the fluids and much more. You can even bring your mechanic! When you bid on a vehicle at Auction Nation, you can trust you are making an educated purchase! We can also sell your vehicle for you! It can be a hassle trying to sell a vehicle with all the phone calls, test drives, and ridiculous low ball offers. It is enough to drive anyone crazy. Our process is fast and simple, just bring your vehicle by and drop it off. We will photograph it, and get it online in our next Weekly Public Auto Auction. We have an auto auction starting every Tuesday and the auction runs until the following Friday. Our rates are the lowest in the business and our payment turnaround time is unmatched in the industry!
These programs are meant to benefit taxpayers as a whole, but could they benefit you, the individual taxpayer? Can you bag a bargain at a government auction? "GSA's goal is to maximize return to the federal government," the GSA spokesperson said. So they're not giving this stuff away. In fact, the government sets "reserves" or minimums for the most valuable property it auctions off. But judging from a wide tour of current government auctions and bids, there are still opportunities to walk away with valuable goods for a great price. Here's a look at who's selling what, where, and for how much.

After 8 years serving their specialty prime rib to the town of Berthoud the Whistle Stop Tavern has closed its doors and the owner has decided to sell all assets at public online auction. This auction to include: Turbo Air sandwich cooler, Southbend 4-burner range with griddle and double oven, fryers, under counter refrigeration, 6-tap direct draw cooler, tables, chairs, booths, wood bar, bar stools, Colorado Rockies stadium flown flag, glassware, smallwares, shelving, stereo, security camera system, TVs and more.


We are a premier full-service private auction company liquidating property seized by police and federal agencies, property from abandoned safe deposit boxes, seized bank assets, bankruptcies, financial institutions, business inventory liquidations, and other consignors. Our firm conducts traditional live auctions throughout the year at various locations across the country, as well as auctions on the Internet. Please see our schedule of upcoming auctions for further details.
Police auctions tend to conjure up images of beat up cars confiscated from drug dealers and mint condition police cruisers that—for one reason or another—never saw service. The reality lies somewhere in the middle, and there are some good deals to be had so long as you're careful, and absolutely sure about what you're doing. Let this list be your insurance.
2. Know what car you're looking for You can find a list of what’s for sale online, either at Govsales.gov (if it’s a federal police auction) or through your local agency/county/department (just Google it). You need to have a decent idea of what you’re wanting to pick up, or you won’t have time to properly vet everything, which could get messy. See above.
When it comes to car auctions, try not to put all your eggs in one basket, because there will always be more chances to score a sweet ride on the cheap. Like gambling, it’s always good to have a limit in place before the bidding starts, because nothing sucks more than overspending on a car that only gets you halfway home before the damn transmission craps out.
If it looks too good to be true, chances are it is, and there’s a simple reason why. While bodywork is expensive, it pales in comparison to the kind of profit a car will turn if a high-bidding buyer doesn’t notice it. A thorough pre-bid inspection should hopefully illuminate any issues prior to putting down your money. For more info on what shoddy bodywork can hide, don’t forget to read our write-up on nine ways you can tell if a car has been in a wreck.
Laura Agadoni has been writing professionally since 1983. Her feature stories on area businesses, human interest and health and fitness appear in her local newspaper. She has also written and edited for a grassroots outreach effort and has been published in "Clean Eating" magazine and in "Dimensions" magazine, a CUNA Mutual publication. Agadoni has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from California State University-Fullerton.
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