Although car auctions might help you in buying a dream car within your budget, it is a fact that these events are not publicized to larger extent. Experts feel that if there is an increase in the number of bidders at these auction, the final bid price will be affected. Again, dealership sale also gets affected with such flocking and it always slides down. Henceforth, you should expect that the auction information will always be hidden from the public. You should try to catch such data on websites that work as search engines for car auctions.

In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.
Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
Monday’s are auction days! Every Monday our Online Auction starts ending at 6pm which, which means the 1st item (which is called a “lot”) ends at 6pm , and every 20-30 seconds another lot ends until the auction is over, whatever the final bid is becomes the winning bidder. 400 Lots = 200 Minutes which equates to the last lot ending at about 9:30. Join us online every Monday where every week where you will see something new, so check the website often!
If you want to buy goods at or below cost, look no further than the U.S. government. Federal and state agencies sell nearly anything you can think of: cars, boats, jewelry, antiques, artwork, aircraft, real estate, houses, clothing, electronics, tools, furniture and medical equipment. The government sells surplus merchandise it no longer needs and items it obtains when it seizes property from criminals or forecloses on homes.
The goods you buy from government auctions are “as is.” Look on the “Terms and Conditions” page before bidding to understand the process. A typical auction page states, for example, that the auction site doesn’t guarantee the quality of the product in any way. Once you bid, you enter a legally binding contract, and you need to follow through with your bid.
Laura Agadoni has been writing professionally since 1983. Her feature stories on area businesses, human interest and health and fitness appear in her local newspaper. She has also written and edited for a grassroots outreach effort and has been published in "Clean Eating" magazine and in "Dimensions" magazine, a CUNA Mutual publication. Agadoni has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from California State University-Fullerton.
×